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Plans to cut fish imports to Homa Bay picks

Plans are underway to boost fish production in Homa Bay county to lock out imports from China, Lakes Turkana and Naivasha that flooded the market due to a deficit of supply in Lake Victoria basin.

Subsequently, a Sub-Saharan fastest growing fish farm dubbed Victory Farm has put in place new modalities to boost fish production in the region to address the shortage that saw an influx of foreign products in the local market.

Grading Machines at Victory Farm. The farm was in a position to produce 8,000 metric tons of fish per year thereby curbing fish shortage. Photo by Brian Odhiambo

Speaking to KNA, the Farm’s Chief Development Officer Caesar Asiyo said that the farm was in a position to produce 8,000 metric tons of fish per year which is a step that could help in curbing fish shortage.

“As an organization, we are capable of producing up to 8000 metric tons of the foodstuff annually to help solve issues with fish deficit,” said Asiyo.

Asiyo said that through Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), they also distribute fingerlings to the local farmers who undertake fish farming in ponds in Homa Bay, Siaya, Kisumu and Migori counties to help them boost production.

According to Victory Farms’ Chief Aquaculture Officer Steve Moran, they are trying to produce even a larger volume of fish as compared to the current number in future as a way of creating a significant impact in reducing fish shortage in Kenya.

“Our main aim is to produce more fish to ensure that we also play a role in curbing the problem of fish shortage in the nation,” said Moran.

The organization, established in Rowo Village in Suba Sub-County, is exercising cage fishing with about 500 cages in Lake Victoria.

The Co-ordinator of Aquaculture Business Development Programme Michael Omondi said that Kenya currently has a fish deficit of 400,000 metric tons per annum, but Victory Farm is putting in efforts to bridge the gap.

“Victory Farm is not only distributing fish in the Nyanza region, but also in other parts of the country. We are optimistic that their efforts will contribute in curbing the shortage,” said Omondi.

He urged the locals to embrace fish farming to boost their economic standing and help in reducing the problem of fish shortage in the county.

By Brian Odhiambo and Sitna Omar

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