Sunday, May 31, 2020
Home > Counties > Makueni > Teenage pregnancies in Kenya a worrying trend, says NCPD Director General

Teenage pregnancies in Kenya a worrying trend, says NCPD Director General

Director General National Council for Population and Development Dr. Josephine Kibaru and Makueni Deputy Governor Ms. Adelina Mwau (purple top) during the launch of the NCPD 2018-2022 strategic plan at Kisayani secondary school in Kibwezi sub-county Thursday, in the company of NCPD chairman Sam Kona

One in every five school girls in Kenya get pregnant while in school, Director General National Council for Population and Development Dr. Josephine Kibaru has said.
Dr. Kibaru said the rising number of teen pregnancies was a major concern in the country and underscored the need to come up with measures to curb the worrying trend.
Speaking at Kisayani secondary school on Thursday in Kibwezi sub-county during the World population Day, the director general said teenage pregnancies force girls to drop out of school hence compromising their future.
“Girls between the ages of 10 and 19 years who give birth are not mature enough to become mothers and their health and those of the children is adversely affected,” she said.
She noted that Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) commonly practiced in places like Narok predisposed girls to early marriages and pregnancies and said there was need to prevent the practice.
She called for collaborative approach from stakeholders to help fight such retrogressive practices that hamper the development of girls in the country.
Policy Engagement and Communications Manager Elizabeth Kahurani said there was need to introduce comprehensive sexuality education to prevent teenage pregnancies.
“When it comes to dealing with teenage pregnancies, deliberate efforts needs to be made as an intervention to the rising cases,” said Kahurani.
On maternal mortalities, she noted that the rate still remained high and called for initiatives to significantly reduce the rate.
‘‘We want a situation where no woman should die while giving birth to life. Initiatives such as beyond zero campaigns should be increased. Though the unmet need has dropped significantly since 1993, it is still high at the current rate of 18%,” said Kahurani.
On her part, Makueni Deputy Governor Ms Adelina Mwau said health facilities should be youth friendly to allow young people access health services especially on family reproductive health.
During the celebration, the NCPD launched its strategic plan for the 2018-2022.
By Patrick Nyakundi/Roselyne Kavoo

Leave a Reply